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The Poundstock Estate Property Sale at Holsworthy

Transcribed from the Camelford & District Post, 2nd October 1909

An important sale was held in the Market Hall, Holsworthy, on Thursday.  The property offered comprised the farms, residences, small holdings, building sites, and cottages of the Poundstock Estate, of the late Mr E. Mucklow (520 acres in all), the whole being quite close to Widemouth Bay.  The properties are intersected by the L. & S.W. Railway, and are within convenient distances of the stations at Whitstone and Bude.  The sale attracted a good deal of attention, and when the sale commenced the large room was well filled.  Mr W. J. Graver, of Bude, was the auctioneer.  The following prices were realized:-

 

 

Purchaser

Sale Price

Bangors House, close to Bude and Widemouth Bay

With pleasure grounds, greenhouses, and 4 ½ acres of meadowland attached. Rent £37 10s

Mr R L Ashton, auctioneer, Bradworthy, acting for a client

£985

Bangors tenement

Rent £3

Mr R L Ashton for a client

£80

Freehold building site, called Easter Close

Rent £4

Mr R L Ashton

£83

Pridham’s Hill tenement

Comprising a two storied house, with garden and plot of land. Rent £5

Mr Greenaway, St Gennys

£170

Freehold building site

 

Mr Pethick, Bude

£60

The ancient manor house of Penfound

Meadowland and orchard. the timber on this lot is valued at £75

Mr Goe. Brendon (Bude);

£570

Freehold farm called Part Penfound and Youldons

With model farm buildings and joiner’s shop the timber on this lot is valued £338

Mr S Hopper (Poundstock)

£1,310

Part Penfound and Wester Burracott

Timber valued at £43

Mr S Hopper

£1,300

Residence called Calmady

 

Mr Davaston (Colebrook)

£930

Tenement called Part Penfound,

 

Mr John Maynard, Tuckingmill, Poundstock

£260

Six enclosures, being part of Penfound

Timber valued at £76

Mr Davaston (Colebrook

£240

Burracott Farm,

timber valued at £20

Mr Stevens, St Gennys

£700

Pasture land at Barracott Bridge

 

Mr Stevens, St Gennys

£25

Arable, pasture and meadow land, part Penfound and Higher Burracott timber valued at £17 Mr Rowland, Exeter £730
Tenement called West Collaton, with a four roomed cottage   Mr Rowland, Exeter £400
Three houses known as Swelle Cottages offered in three lots, were withdrawn and then offered in one lot   Mr A S Brewis, Whalley Range £390
Manaton House sold subject to a life interest of the present tenant, aged 79   Miss S Cowling of Poundstock £500
Accommodation land, part of Kennacott   Miss S Cowling, of Manaton House £91
The total proceeds of sale, including timber were £9,403

(Based on the retail price index  £1 in 1909 was equivalent to £77.67 in 2008.  The total proceeds would be worth £741,332.52)

Below is the original text, for ease of reading it has been listed in the table above.

Bangors House, close to Bude and Widemouth Bay, with pleasure grounds, greenhouses, and 4 ½ acres of meadowland attached (rent £37 10s), sold for £985 to Mr R L Ashton, auctioneer, Bradworthy, acting for a client.  Bangors tenement, 2a 1r 21p (rent £3), was purchased by Mr R L Ashton for a client at £80.  Freehold building site, called Easter Close, 3a 2r 29p (rent £4), sold at £83 to Mr R L Ashton.  Pridham’s Hill tenement, comprising a two storied house, with garden and plot of land, 2r 34p in area (rent £5); £170 to Mr Greenaway, St Gennys.  Freehold building site, of about 1a or 19p sold to Mr Pethick (Bude), at £60.  The ancient manor house of Penfound, with about 9a 3r 19p of meadow and orchard land; purchased at £570 by Mr Goe. Brendon (Bude); the timber on this lot is valued at £75.  Freehold farm called Part Penfound and Youldons 102a 2r 11p, with model farm buildings and joiner’s shop (the timber on this lot is valued £338, bought by Mr S Hopper (Poundstock) for £1,310.  Part Penfound and Wester Burracott, a farm of 120a or 26p (timber valued at £43) made £1,300 to Mr S Hopper.  Residence called Calmady, with 36a or26p sold to Mr Davaston (Colebrook) at £930.  Tenement called Part Penfound, area 18a 2r 17p sold to Mr John Maynard, Tuckingmill, Poundstock, for £260.  Six enclosures, being part of Penfound, 24a or 12p (timber valued at £76); Mr Davaston (Colebrook), at £240.  Burracott Farm, 70a or 9p (timber valued at £20), bought by Mr Stevens, St Gennys, at £700.  Pasture land, covering 1a 1r 10p at Barracott Bridge, made £25 to Mr Stevens, St Gennys.  Arable, pasture and meadow land, part Penfound and Higher Burracott, 71a 2r 13p (timber valued at £17), sold to Mr Rowland, Exeter, for £730.  Tenement called West Collaton, containing 48a 1r 2p with a four roomed cottage sold to Mr Rowland, Exeter, for £400.  Three houses known as Swelle Cottages offered in three lots, were withdrawn and then offered in one lot, and sold to Mr A S Brewis, Whalley Range, for £390.  Manaton House sold subject to a life interest of the present tenant, aged 79, was purchased by Miss S Cowling of Poundstock, for £500.  Accommodation land, part of Kennacott, 2a 2r 26p £91 to Miss S Cowling, of Manaton House.  The total proceeds of sale, including timber were £9,403.

Information

Rods, poles and perches are different names for the same unit. Medieval ploughing was done with oxen, up to 4 pairs at a time. The ploughman handled the plough. His boy controlled the oxen using a stick, which had to be long enough to reach all the oxen. This was the rod, pole or perch. It was an obvious implement to measure the fields, such as 4 poles to the chain. A BBC webpage about allotments says that "an allotment plot is 10 poles" and claims that "A pole is measured as the length from the back of the plough to the nose of the ox". I suppose that if you wanted to control the front ox, you needed a pole long enough to reach! The perch was used in the reign of Henry II (1154-1189), the pole since the 16C, and the rod since 1450. In the 16th century the lawful rod was decreed to be the combined length of the left feet of 16 men as they left church on a Sunday morning. In North Devon there is a tradition that fencing, that is to say the cutting and laying of a hedge, would be done at so much a land yard, which seemed to be about 5 paces or 5.5 yards, which would equate to a rod, pole or perch. An earlier name for a rod was a gyrd which is the derivation of a yard.